26. Lockdown clues to human evolution

If you happen to be one of those people who, as I sometimes do, reads science fiction, you will be aware that one of the most common expectations for human evolution into the distant future is that we will evolve to have small bodies, atrophied limbs and supersized heads, to house our overdeveloped brains. This expectation ignores the possibilities offered by bioengineering and mechanical technology integration, but that is for another post. My observation during this lockdown, however, is that most people seem to spend their time lying about the house, randomly snacking on junk food and wasting a lot of time on social media. This is a lost opportunity, when so much time for exercise of the body and the mind is available. And it presents us with an alternative possible evolutionary path, in which we evolve to have large, round, flabby bodies, tiny heads to house dwindling brains and huge thumbs to contribute to the cacophony of nonsense prevalent in social networks. Your preference? 

Comments

Melkisecebe said…
My guess is that along history, during crisis or regular time, a fair amount of people spends their time resting, eating, gossiping... a little percentage of people keeps the enegy and passion to engage in meaningful activities for the body and the soul... and thise are the ones driving human evolution. The others are just there, the human equivalent of inertia in physics
Sandra K. said…
Indeed, our daily choices determine the future - a very worthwhile seed for thought, darling.
SantiDominguezV said…
Yes, good point... i guess the key is that there are enough of the ones who keep evolving in the right direction to remain sustainable... and that the lazy gene does not become more successful due to long term lockdown...
SantiDominguezV said…
Yes, our daily choices determine our future, but we often make them like if they did not, or thinking that the future is going to be the same as the present, which is, at least, a tad misguided... darling ;-)

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