66. The disappearance of Europe from the British public eye

The biggest news this week, in global terms, was the announcement of the EU recovery fund which I covered in post 63. A huge effort in economic terms but, even more importantly, a rare exercise in cross border solidarity. However, despite its seminal importance, it is practically impossible to find in UK news. The EU is one of the subjects I read about the most. Tales of EU failure and woe often feature prominently at the top of my digital news, selected by algorithms which, day after day, try to build an understanding of my interests. But news of this fund was number 43 in the list presented to me, well below items of little importance which I have little interest in. This is peculiar. I am not given to believing in conspiracies, I have trained myself to reject them as oversimplistic explanations of haphazardly converging interests and motivations and, again, I am confident there is no conspiracy here. But it is worth studying. Big news should be big news, even if it is about the EU

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Comments

Sandra K. said…
Indeed, it is bizarre that there are no good news about the EU on headlines or at all unless one enters a specific search...is the public being manipulated through targeted information to benefit the very few? Something clearly worth to think about...
SantiDominguezV said…
Manipulation I am not sure, but it is quite possible. I will continue to study this phenomenon and gather more data before I draw any conclusions, but it is, at first sight, very peculiar. The failure 3 weeks ago to propose this very Recovery Fund was number 3 in the headlines, despite the fact that the announcement was not expected on that date and therefore the failure only existed in the imagination of Daily Telegraph reporters. Its announcement 3 weeks later, however, only the 43rd headline, despite being a huge fund...

Difficult to understand how the algorithm is working, for sure

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